NON VISIBLE IMAGING —- ABSTRACT & SEMINARS

                                                              NON VISIBLE IMAGING

             Near infrared light consists of light just beyond visible red
light (wavelengths greater than 780nm). Contrary to popular thought,
near infrared photography does not allow the recording of thermal
radiation (heat). Far-infrared thermal imaging requires more specialized
equipment. Infrared images exhibit a few distinct effects that
give them an exotic, antique look. Plant life looks completely
white because it reflects almost all infrared light (because of
this effect, infrared photography is commonly used in aerial photography
to analyze crop yields, pest control, etc.) The sky is a stark
black because no infrared light is scattered. Human skin looks
pale and ghostly. Dark sunglasses all but disappear in infrared
because they don’t block any infrared light, and it’s said that
you can capture the near infrared emissions of a common iron.
            
             Infrared photography
has been around for at least 70 years, but until recently has
not been easily accessible to those not versed in traditional
photographic processes. Since the charge-coupled devices (CCDs)
used in digital cameras and camcorders are sensitive to near-infrared
light, they can be used to capture infrared photos. With a filter
that blocks out all visible light (also frequently called a “cold
mirror” filter), most modern digital cameras and camcorders
can capture photographs in infrared. In addition, they have LCD
screens, which can be used to preview the resulting image in real-time,
a tool unavailable in traditional photography without using filters
that allow some visible (red) light through.
INTRODUCTION:
             Near infrared
light consists of light just beyond visible red light (wavelengths
greater than 780nm). Contrary to popular thought, near infrared
photography does not allow the recording of thermal radiation
(heat). Far-infrared thermal imaging requires more specialized
equipment. Infrared images exhibit a few distinct effects that
give them an exotic, antique look. Plant life looks completely
white because it reflects almost all infrared light (because of
this effect, infrared photography is commonly used in aerial photography
to analyze crop yields, pest control, etc.) The sky is a stark
black because no infrared light is scattered. 
            Human skin looks
pale and ghostly. Dark sunglasses all but disappear in infrared
because they don’t block any infrared light, and it’s said that
you can capture the near infrared emissions of a common iron
             Near-infrared
(1000 – 3000 nm) spectrometry, which employs an external light
source for determination of chemical composition, has been previously
utilized for industrial determination of the fat content of commercial
meat products, for in vivo determination of body fat, and in our
laboratories for determination of lipoprotein composition in carotid
artery atherosclerotic plaques. Near-infrared (IR) spectrometry
has been used industrially for several years to determine saturation
of unsaturated fatty acid esters (1). Near-IR spectrometry uses
an tunable light source external to the experimental subject to
determine its chemical composition.
           Industrial utilization of
near-IR will allow for the in vivo measurement of the tissue-specific
rate of oxygen utilization as an indirect estimate of energy expenditure.
However, assessment of regional oxygen consumption by these methods
is complex, requiring a high level of surgical skill for implantation
of indwelling catheters to isolate the organ under study.

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